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  1. TopTop #91
    seedavelee's Avatar
    seedavelee
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    I find this thread interesting. First, I'm one to look at where the title is coming from before I open it and get further involved. It took me a while - like years to learn this while browsing on the internet. A few of you who have posted here about Fox News or Entertainment, I too have a pretty strong negative bias against them. In saying this, is it wrong to completely dismiss what this woman (contributor) on Fox has to say? She may have some important input or a helpful suggestion with regard to remedies for homelessness. Possibly? Maybe the best argument for not opening the article, video, or whatever her offering is, is "I don't extend my time (which is limited) to a view that likely won't resonate with mine related to our discussion and hopeful remedy to our local homelessness".
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  3. TopTop #92
    finnie
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Here's something interesting about Fox news - i abhor the national programs but lo and behold, it turns out that Fox 2 San Francisco is capable of some very good reporting on local issues. Reporter Deborah Villalon usually tells it like it is (but not 100% and not always but definitely worth listening to.

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by bakerchic: View Post
    I don't think Fox is being pre-judged. It's not prejudice if an opinion or actions are based on another person's decade-long history of a certain position which they have never disavowed. ...
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  4. TopTop #93

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by finnie: View Post
    Here's something interesting about Fox news - i abhor the national programs but lo and behold, it turns out that Fox 2 San Francisco is capable of some very good reporting on local issues. Reporter Deborah Villalon usually tells it like it is (but not 100% and not always but definitely worth listening to.
    like everything else, it gets complicated. Overall I think they're a big factor in destroying civil society, but other than that, they have some redeeming qualities. There certainly are some skilled reporters there, several of whom are actually good at challenging those they interview regardless of ideology. They'd be able to fit into any msm outfit. Their network broadcasts more than just shows populated by right-wing wackos, sycophants, and blondes in tight dresses, though they have more of all the above than any other media outlet that I can think of. They have the Simpsons, for god's sake. Murdoch is pretty willing to show anything that makes a buck, but he doesn't want to alienate the Fox loyalists by making it easy for them to encounter something disturbing to them. Local stations, affiliated with Fox, are a much more varied bunch.

    but they still claim the Australian fires are caused by arsonists and the fact that lefties won't sweep the forests.
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  6. TopTop #94
    Barry's Avatar
    Barry
    Founder & Moderator

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail


    Sonoma County officials move toward clearing Joe Rodota Trail

    MARY CALLAHAN AND NASHELLY CHAVEZ
    THE PRESS DEMOCRAT January 29, 2020, 1:35PM

    Sonoma County authorities began easing homeless campers off the Joe Rodota Trail in Santa Rosa on Wednesday with verbal warnings that will transition to citations and, potentially, arrests by week’s end if need be, officials said.

    County representatives said they hope no arrests are necessary — that when the Friday deadline hits, after weeks’ of advance notice, those who have been living along the public trail will leave willingly, on their own, as they have with previous camp sweeps.

    The county hopes to have all residents off the trail by then so they can begin cleaning the parkland of debris and filth that accumulated during the six-month encampment.

    But there remains enough clear resistance among the estimated 250 people who still call it home that a voluntary exodus is not guaranteed.

    In that case, county park rangers will be prepared to make arrests, Sonoma County Parks Director Bert Whitaker said.

    “The spirit of this is certainly that it’s our absolutely last resort, (but) we’ve made arrangements to be able to do so, and park rangers have the authority to do so,” he said.

    Continues here

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  7. TopTop #95
    DavidMySky's Avatar
    DavidMySky
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    I wrote that, as I was reading his post, I would watch the video despite it coming from Fox (don't call it news) Entertainment, but then I scrolled down a bit furthur and saw D'Souza's name. I was not going to fall for a double fake news whammy of Fox and D'Souza. That would be too much toxic waste to consume in a lifetime.

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by seedavelee: View Post
    I find this thread interesting. ..
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  8. TopTop #96
    DavidMySky's Avatar
    DavidMySky
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    The one tent that really caught my attention was the two story condo with the central heating. I figure if he refuses to leave, the building inspector could come and red tag him, 'cuz that place is definitely not up to code.
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  10. TopTop #97
    79paul's Avatar
    79paul
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    1. I've been in Vancouver twice in the last 2 months, and there are not the number of homeless that there are in the Bay area, for a number of reasons. Better health care for all (No medical bankruptcies), better mental health outreach, etc. Whoever told you such a tale is exaggerating.

    2. Your friend on the bike is also probably also pulling numbers out of thin air. The Homeless count that goes on every year (was due to happen on Jan 29, but postponed due to the current emergency), now scheduled for end of February, does a very good job of physically counting all the unhoused in the county on a single morning. Involving hundreds of volunteers plus paid homeless (who know the places where people sleep) cover every foot of the county on a single day. Don't believe it? https://sonomacounty.ca.gov/CDC/Home...omeless-Count/ check out the data, or better yet, volunteer to help with the count.

    PS the current best guess for 2019 is just under 3000. Still a horrendous number, unacceptable on many levels, but the tone of your post is too alarmist. And yes, I too believe capitalism IS the problem.

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by Mayacaman: View Post

    ...He informed me that there are probably ten thousand homeless people in Sonoma County. ...
    ... On Sunday, I was informed firsthand by someone from Vancouver, B.C., that - in the present - there are big tent cities in Vancouver. - And all across Canada also, on account of the astronomical rise in the cost of Rent.
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  12. TopTop #98
    Shandi's Avatar
    Shandi
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Seers have been considered "mad" but are now accepted in mainstream culture, and even sought out and paid for their services if successfully marketed.


    Quote Posted in reply to the post by Mayacaman: View Post
    Frankly, I think the madman on the bicycle is a Seer
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  14. TopTop #99
    cyberanvil
    Guest

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Mark Evans (aka Mayacaman) writes


    Quote
    This problem is so enormous. We really need to step back and consider the parameters of it. The social fabric in the Western Hemisphere is hemorrhaging; the System is breaking down - before our very eyes. On Sunday, I was informed firsthand by someone from Vancouver, B.C., that - in the present - there are big tent cities in Vancouver. - And all across Canada also, on account of the astronomical rise in the cost of Rent.
    Perhaps much of what Ted Kaczynski said was correct when he wrote 'Industrial Society and Its Future.'
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  16. TopTop #100
    cyberanvil
    Guest

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    I must admit that I haven't followed all the details of the Trail people relocation, but it seems lacking. Basically, the County is spending almost 12 million dollars to provide for 60 people and all the rest will be arrested if they don't skeedadle. Is this it in a nutshell?
    Last edited by Barry; 01-31-2020 at 05:15 PM.
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  18. TopTop #101
    cyberanvil
    Guest

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by DavidMySky: View Post
    I wrote that, as I was reading his post, I would watch the video despite it coming from Fox (don't call it news) Entertainment, but then I scrolled down a bit furthur and saw D'Souza's name. I was not going to fall for a double fake news whammy of Fox and D'Souza. That would be too much toxic waste to consume in a lifetime.

    Yes, D'Souza is a wack job and even though he documents everything he says, he should be dismissed.
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  19. TopTop #102
    cyberanvil
    Guest

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by podfish: View Post
    there is a reason that in a society, people do concern themselves with their reputations and strive to maintain a good one. Fox doesn't have a good one, for excellent reasons. Note the previous poster's not unwilling to consider the idea, but he is unwilling to sit through a video based on one endorsement when his previous experience with the source was so poor.

    I know it's an easy way to argue on the interwebs and all, but posting links to sources that have a reputation of being strongly ideological, that don't have any counterbalancing virtues (like, say, intellectual rigor) isn't a great way to actually change anyone's mind.
    You're correct. It's best to stick with Rachel Maddow and MSNBC.
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  20. TopTop #103
    Mayacaman's Avatar
    Mayacaman
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by 79paul: View Post
    1. I've been in Vancouver twice in the last 2 months, and there are not the number of homeless that there are in the Bay area, for a number of reasons. Better health care for all (No medical bankruptcies), better mental health outreach, etc. Whoever told you such a tale is exaggerating.

    2. Your friend on the bike is also probably also pulling numbers out of thin air. The Homeless count that goes on every year (was due to happen on Jan 29, but postponed due to the current emergency), now scheduled for end of February, does a very good job of physically counting all the unhoused in the county on a single morning. Involving hundreds of volunteers plus paid homeless (who know the places where people sleep) cover every foot of the county on a single day. Don't believe it? https://sonomacounty.ca.gov/CDC/Home...omeless-Count/ check out the data, or better yet, volunteer to help with the count.

    PS the current best guess for 2019 is just under 3000. Still a horrendous number, unacceptable on many levels, but the tone of your post is too alarmist. And yes, I too believe capitalism IS the problem.

    Paul, I don't think that the man who stays up all night riding his bicycle to stay warm {how about alive?} is completely balanced, but riding down the highways and hedges, he sure does run into a whole lot of homeless - more than you or I do, who have roofs over our heads.

    Ten thousand? I thought the number extreme; but then again, I totally accept him as a legitimate witness. I do. Mad though he may be; he is credible. And I would contend with you that he is not "pulling numbers out of thin air." I also accept his word that there are way more homeless here in Sonoma County than the Census chooses to acknowledge or believe exist. Point of Fact: an accurate Count can not be done in a single day.

    If you would like to discuss the issue of the numbers with the Oracle on the bicycle, you may be able to meet him, if you show up at the Homeless Action ! meetings at the Methodist Church on Montgomery Avenue in Santa Rosa on Mondays at 9:30. His name is Eddie.

    As far as the other fellow - the man from Vancouver - all I can say is that he too, seems credible. And, when I do the web search, spinning the words, "Vancouver, Homeless, 2019, 2020," a lot comes up. That's all I know. I haven't been to Vancouver myself since the early 70's. I'm an armchair traveler now. And I agree with you both - Capitalism - especially the greedy, ideological bastard variety of it - is the root of this sickness.
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  21. TopTop #104
    Mayacaman's Avatar
    Mayacaman
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by podfish: View Post
    for any social issue, I like to look back and see first, if it's really new; and second, what is different than what came before.

    This one baffles me. We do have precedents; the Hoovervilles, for one. Hobos were a 'thing', as were Gypsies, etc. So pretty clearly we haven't historically done a great job of housing everyone. Half-seriously, maybe it's because KMart tents are only a few bucks, so now people can have shelter out where we can all see them. Maybe the cops used to run people off more effectively. Or maybe there really were fewer homeless people because rents were cheaper. But it's not like there's tons of unused housing that the poor can't afford. Or, maybe I'm wrong, is there? I know a lot of high-end properties sit empty, plus there are "investment properties" sitting open like the one in Oakland that's attracted such attention. I wouldn't expect that to be enough to account for the current situation.

    Yes, Peter, We do have precedents. It's been going on for ten thousand years. And, sure enough, rents were way less - even twenty years ago. My Okie friend informs me that there are plenty of empty old houses back in Oklahoma - in the present. But one needs scratch {$$} - and a job - to make the rent. Meanwhile, for the folks on the Joe Rodota
    Trail , Woody Guthrie's old song still describes the situation...It's an old song.

    ?
    Last edited by Barry; 01-31-2020 at 10:56 PM.
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  22. TopTop #105
    DavidMySky's Avatar
    DavidMySky
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    It might be cheaper in dollars and cents to live in Oklahoma, but the culture tax will kill you.

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by Mayacaman: View Post

    Yes, Peter, We do have precedents. It's been going on for ten thousand years. And, sure enough, rents were way less - even twenty years ago. My Okie friend informs me that there are plenty of empty old houses back in Oklahoma - in the present. But one needs scratch {$$} - and a job - to make the rent. Meanwhile, for the folks on the Joe Rodota
    Trail , Woody Guthrie's old song still describes the situation...It's an old song.

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  24. TopTop #106

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by cyberanvil: View Post

    Yes, D'Souza is a wack job and even though he documents everything he says, he should be dismissed.
    was that an agreement, or ironic?
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  25. TopTop #107
    cyberanvil
    Guest

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by podfish: View Post
    was that an agreement, or ironic?
    Door #2.
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  26. TopTop #108
    rossmen
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    You're right about the arrest threat for the vast majority, news is it seems to be working, they're moving on. Only a few of the twelve mill goes to the temp? Oakmont village. The biggest chunk is to buy a few houses for permanent supportive or transitional shelter. Some goes to supportive county agencies or nonprofit budgets. There is also funding for two long term sanctioned camping spots, locations to be determined, the county is looking for proposals.

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by cyberanvil: View Post
    I must admit that I haven't followed all the details of the Trail people relocation, but it seems lacking. Basically, the County is spending almost 12 million dollars to provide for 60 people and all the rest will be arrested if they don't skeedadle. Is this it in a nutshell?
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  27. TopTop #109

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by rossmen: View Post
    ... The biggest chunk is to buy a few houses for permanent supportive or transitional shelter. Some goes to supportive county agencies or nonprofit budgets. There is also funding for two long term sanctioned camping spots, locations to be determined, the county is looking for proposals.
    that's a good observation. It's easy to take 12 million divided by a few hundred and think it's a ridiculous amount of money. But it's not like they're buying donuts & coffee with it. There's a healthy chunk that's much longer term
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  29. TopTop #110
    cyberanvil
    Guest

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by podfish: View Post
    that's a good observation. It's easy to take 12 million divided by a few hundred and think it's a ridiculous amount of money. But it's not like they're buying donuts & coffee with it. There's a healthy chunk that's much longer term
    If the county hasn't determined the solutions, how did they decide on the 12 million? Is this a case of the cart before the horse?
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  30. TopTop #111
    Farmer Lynda's Avatar
    Farmer Lynda
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Thoughts on the Joe Rodota Trail (JRT) Clearing & Closure

    On Friday afternoon — between visits to the JRT and meetings with County and city staff — a KQED reporter asked me a question about the ongoing clearing of the JRT encampment.

    I was explaining that we’d had zero arrests, that we were continuing to offer services to residents as we were clearing the trail, that we hadn’t run out of shelter beds, that we were offering storage for each and every person’s belongings.

    “So, would you say it’s a success?” the reporter asked, in a well-intentioned way.

    The word “success” gave me pause. Actually, it made me want to scream. On the one hand, Friday was a day of witnessing regular human beings doing amazing things.

    I can’t say enough good things about County staff. Regional Parks rangers turned into social workers and performed the hard work of enforcement with dignity, humanity, and respect— with heart, and without a single arrest.

    Our actual social and healthcare workers went above and beyond the call of duty to try to help trail residents. It was professional, but it was also personal. One fostered cats from the trail in his own home, returned the cats to the owner spayed and neutered, and is now fostering them again until the owner has a permanent place to live. Meanwhile, volunteers and advocates worked alongside County staff to convince more trail residents to accept services, to move to Los Guilicos Village, to go to a shelter. They helped people pack. They fought through their own, and their clients’, tears and frustration.

    On Friday, everyone was working as hard as they possibly could with the absolute best of intentions and it didn’t matter who you were or what your job title was. Our Director of Regional Parks pushed a cart full of a homeless man’s belongings along the trail for him, just as our Director of Permit Sonoma had dug postholes out at Los Guilicos Village to get the village open in time for the camp closure. Names were crossed out on lists, new names written, as people accepted services, rejected them, and sometimes accepted them again. As night fell I was on Sharpie duty, writing people’s names on duct tape stuck to plastic totes, readying their belongings for storage. One woman had suffered a concussion and couldn’t be near the bright lights that had been set up so staff could continue working. We made a space in a darkened area for her to inventory her belongings before they moved onto storage.

    But at the end of the day, even if you succeed in clearing the trail in as dignified and humane a manner as possible, there is nothing “successful” about clearing a trail of more than 200 unsheltered residents. Because at the end of the day, there are broken people made more broken. At the end of the day, there are people who refuse to accept services who wind up sitting with the only things they own on the planet heaped high on a sidewalk… people confused, walking into traffic… people with crazy contraptions carrying their belongings perched precariously on bikes setting off for an unknown destination without heat, without electricity, without running water, without a toilet.

    Because at the end of the day, even if every single trail resident had accepted our services, 200 people on a trail is less than TEN PERCENT of our homeless population countywide.

    Did you know that some people were treated in a hospital for severe injuries or potentially fatal illnesses — and were discharged to recover in their tents on the JRT? Did you know that trail residents included pregnant women and transitional aged youth? Did you know that of Sonoma County’s total population, 1.6% are black, but that black people made up 5% of the trail’s population? Did you know that some people would leave the trail to go to work, and return to find their belongings stolen?

    This is a racial justice issue. This is a generational justice issue. And of course, this is also about mental healthcare access, lack of affordable housing, an underfunded safety net, opioid overprescription, and a whole host of other things.

    At the end of the day the thing that keeps going through my mind is this: our world breaks people, and we don’t have the resources to help them put themselves back together. Like the nursery rhyme.

    The trail needed to be cleared. The trail was a public health and safety hazard for trail residents and neighbors. The trail was cleared, and Friday was a day of humans trying to help other humans in an imperfect world and imperfect system.

    But we shouldn’t use the word “success” until we have solutions for the 2,000+ people living on the streets of Sonoma County.
    Last edited by Barry; 02-03-2020 at 03:59 PM.
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  31. TopTop #112
    arthunter's Avatar
    arthunter
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Kind Lynda, I have seen you in action many times and wish to thank you for the dedication to our community that I see.

    The idea that this is a simple, easily correctable problem is naive. As someone who tried to help the homeless directly, I can say that some of the underlying issues that contribute to this massive problem are not being addressed. I am now in danger of losing my home because I didn't recognize the symptoms of meth addiction until it was too late. I took in three people who stopped paying rent and wouldn't leave, leaving me hard pressed to finance my pricey Sonoma County rental as a senior citizen, without long, drawn out court battles. I have two friends who experienced the same thing and lost their homes.

    I talked to my doctor about this and she confirmed that it's a mega problem in Sonoma County. When will the drug problem be addressed as one of the most critical aspects of this whole mess? I never would have guessed that it would be my compassion for my fellow man which would take me down.
    Quote Posted in reply to the post by Farmer Lynda: View Post
    Thoughts on the Joe Rodota Trail (JRT) Clearing & Closure On Friday afternoon ...
    Last edited by Barry; 02-03-2020 at 10:48 PM.
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  33. TopTop #113
    patnicholson
    Supporting Member

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    CRLA, legal aid, the senior center, can offer legal services based on ability to pay.

    you can call or walk in to talk to them.

    511 or 211 may also provide resources, if you are unable to hire an atty.

    it's possible the small claims court advisor could assist you. Good Luck.


    Quote Posted in reply to the post by arthunter: View Post
    ... I am now in danger of losing my home because I didn't recognize the symptoms of meth addiction until it was too late. I took in three people who stopped paying rent and wouldn't leave, leaving me hard pressed to finance my pricey Sonoma County rental as a senior citizen, without long, drawn out court battles. I have two friends who experienced the same thing and lost their homes.
    ...
    Last edited by Barry; 02-05-2020 at 11:28 AM.
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  34. TopTop #114
    OldGranddad
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Homeless

    We spent the weekend in San Francisco for the first time in years. We went to breakfast at an “in” restaurant in the Tenderloin area. We found a parking place a block and a half away and walked. The sidewalk was lined on the curb side and the building side with tents and sleeping bags with only a foot and a half down the middle to walk on. I saw people living in abject misery without hope. Images of prisoners at Auschwitz sprang to mind. In my area we have the Joe Rodota hiking trail lined with tents. This was orders of magnitude worse. I looked into the eyes of those people and smelled their smells and lost my appetite. I was overcome with grief and sadness and, because I am old and not as “evolved” as I’d like to be, expressed my feelings in anger and probably ruined breakfast for my family. I was consumed with guilt seeing the disparity between those people on the street and the fancy, pricey breakfast menu. How can this happen in a land of such wealth and plenty? Where are our hearts? We are as guilty as the Nazis.

    This problem has existed in San Francisco for far longer than the thirty-five years I have been there. Every so often a Band-Aid is applied, but there has never been a real solution. The left focuses on the rights of the homeless and thinks they should be able to camp on the street. The right blames the situation on the homeless and thinks they should be responsible for fixing it. Both sides are unreasonable and both sides are wrong.

    I realize that many good people and organizations have done many things to alleviate the problem and even the “government” has kicked in once in a while, but the sad fact is that homelessness has persisted throughout our history. Without an overall framework provided by the Federal government this problem will never have a real solution. Without recognizing homelessness as a national catastrophe that we, as a nation are all responsible for curing, there is no hope.

    Those people on the street have rights, but so do I. You and I should be able to walk on public property without seeing hands begging for money and the horrible conditions in which those people exist. They, on the other hand, have the right to a reasonable life. The question is, how can both sets of rights be satisfied fairly? Simply incarcerating them recognizes my rights and further violates theirs. How can we be fair to both?

    We could build centers to house them reasonably and provide all the medical care, both physical and mental, they need. We could educate them and give them the tools to provide for themselves. Those who haven’t the capacity to succeed in the outside world could be trained to help run the centers in a safe environment. I suppose that we could provide a sanitary campground for the ones that prefer to stay in the outdoors. Needless to say, they would not have a choice about going to the center. Also, begging and squatting on public land would be made a crime. Those who pass through the center more than twice would be put in jail. Sound Draconian? Perhaps, but it would satisfy both sets of rights in a constructive way.

    If we made these decisions it would then be time to work on partial measures to implement the plan. Starting with partial measures with no idea of where they lead will guarantee that a good solution will never be reached. Relying on charity will do the same.

    The cost to implement such a plan would be great, but the cost to our souls if we don’t will be far greater. We are an affluent country and can well afford to do this. It is time to educate all of our young so that they might be able to care for themselves properly. In addition to alleviating homelessness, this would also be a great leap forward in coming closer to the ideals upon which our country was founded. The sad fact is that we place little value on educating all of our children. It is time that we have fair tax laws and that the rich pay their fair share. It is time to get money out of politics. If this does not happen soon, it is time for revolution.
    Shame on you, San Francisco. Shame on you, California. Shame on you, Uncle Sam!

    Old Granddad
    Last edited by Barry; 02-05-2020 at 11:30 AM.
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  36. TopTop #115
    arthunter's Avatar
    arthunter
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Bless you Pat! ... I am receiving help through legal aid and they are a wonderful organization. A friend has offered me lodging should I need it.

    I want to emphasize that these tenants are not bad people, in fact they're brilliant professional people, every one of them. They are just addicts. The number one reason for addiction is trauma and I am supportive of trauma victims when I can be.

    Portugal is now focused on voluntary drug treatment instead of jail time and it's working well for them. Free treatment here without fear of incarceration might help as would drug education in our schools. We are losing valuable people and endangering our communities by not doing anything.
    Quote Posted in reply to the post by patnicholson: View Post
    CRLA, legal aid, the senior center, can offer legal services based on ability to pay....
    Last edited by Barry; 02-05-2020 at 11:32 AM.
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  38. TopTop #116
    Shandi's Avatar
    Shandi
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Beautifully and soulfully expressed. Who was it that said "The poor you will always have with you"? Are we being Christ-like to accept this? Maybe better to reflect on this "there but for the grace of God go I". We can never truly relate to other's misfortune until we've walked a mile in their shoes (or their shoeless feet).

    Sometimes compassion must be born out of experience, rather than in-born or taught. Babies don't hate unless they're taught to, with words and actions. They also aren't natural survivors, and come in, dependent on caregivers for the first few years. They also learn from what they hear and observe. Imagine what the homeless and encamped/imprisoned children are learning. (Here and everywhere on the planet) Whatever it is, that will be passed on, if they survive. Will they become a new breed of criminals, rising up from being despised and hated? We already know that this is the seed of violence against the self and others. Are we unconsciously contributing to that which we hate? Just something to consider.... Are we part of the problem, or part of the solution?

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by OldGranddad: View Post
    Homeless

    We spent the weekend in San Francisco for the first time in years. ...
    Last edited by Barry; 02-06-2020 at 01:44 PM.
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  40. TopTop #117

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by Shandi: View Post
    Beautifully and soulfully expressed. Who was it that said "The poor you will always have with you"? Are we being Christ-like to accept this?
    note the context of that quote. It wasn't implying unconcern, it was an acknowledgment - from someone who was known to take care of the poor - that the caregivers themselves deserved care as well, that this is an ongoing duty, not a solvable and temporary problem.
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  42. TopTop #118
    Shandi's Avatar
    Shandi
     

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Compassion doesn't take us down; it's acting with compassion directly (person to person) without due diligence, or if our compassion serves us in some way, which creates a positive perception fed by our own needs. (monthly rent)

    When we need to pay the rent, we can be taken in by the appearance and wonderful sounding people who apply for our rental.

    I've experienced this myself, actually more than once. Not vetting people properly has cost me thousands of dollars and peace of mind, in addition to a severe threat to my mental and physical health. (more than once!)

    It also contributes to fear of renting out an extra room or two, even when we could use the financial help. I know a woman who has a 5 bedroom house, with 4 of those rooms filled with "stuff", which is much safer than having people in them. Another woman has a room reserved for her cat, rather than a human.

    Human beings are complex, and all carry hidden secrets, some more damaging than others. I still don't trust myself to bring a stranger into my space. I've been my own worst enemy, always looking for the "good" in people. If someone is living on the fringe, it can mean that they have been marginalized by any number of things, possibly for a long time. Anyone who has experienced this from their own family, knows the damage it can do on so many levels.

    I understand that SHARE Sonoma County does free vetting of both parties, but I don't know the extent of that, or how successful their matches are for the majority of those who've used the service.

    I know of a home (compound)that's owned by meth addicts in Sebastopol, and a rental will soon be available, since my friend who rented a room there, recently committed suicide. They probably won't advertise it, but will draw from their meth friends.

    I also know of a wonderful rental that's recently become available, since being vacated by mentally ill tenants, who put up a great front, only 5 months ago. They left without paying the last month's rent, and a mess for my disabled friend to clean up. There's more to the story, which includes the previous tenant now sending threatening texts. Scary and unnerving for a conscious, kind, and compassionate landlord.

    Protecting ourselves from this kind of thing is a priority for our well-being. But how?

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by arthunter: View Post
    ...As someone who tried to help the homeless directly, I can say that some of the underlying issues that contribute to this massive problem are not being addressed. I am now in danger of losing my home because I didn't recognize the symptoms of meth addiction until it was too late. ..
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  44. TopTop #119
    cyberanvil
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    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Quote Posted in reply to the post by Shandi: View Post

    Are we unconsciously contributing to that which we hate? Just something to consider.... Are we part of the problem, or part of the solution?
    History seems to indicate that we can be both. It's called reality.
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  46. TopTop #120
    cyberanvil
    Guest

    Re: Homeless Emergency on Joe Rodota Trail

    Not just JRT, but for homelessness in general, does this make sense? Thoughts.

    The Only Plan to End Homelessness
    https://californiaglobe.com/section-...-homelessness/
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