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  1. TopTop #1
    treasure
    Guest

    Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Due to awkward location, complex construction requirements, and problematic financing, I don't support the Barlow Development. But one part of that proposal does appeal to me: a year-round farmers market, which I'd like to see in a central Sebastopol location, such as one of the city-owned parking lots.

    I believe there's widespread support for a year-round market. Wouldn't constructing it outside the flood zone be simpler and more affordable than constructing it inside the flood zone?

    Tara Treasurefield
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  3. TopTop #2
    Thad's Avatar
    Thad
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Quote treasure wrote: View Post
    Due to awkward location, complex construction requirements, and problematic financing, I don't support the Barlow Development. But one part of that proposal does appeal to me: a year-round farmers market, which I'd like to see in a central Sebastopol location, such as one of the city-owned parking lots.

    I believe there's widespread support for a year-round market. Wouldn't constructing it outside the flood zone be simpler and more affordable than constructing it inside the flood zone?

    Tara Treasurefield
    Food for thought?

    all year 24/7





    http://www.capitalpress.com/newslett...Mkt-092311-art

    Iconic market thrives amid skyscrapers


    Updated: Thursday, September 22, 2011 10:26 AM

    Pike Place Market keeps fresh produce as centerpiece of tourist attraction
    By STEVE BROWN
    Capital Press
    SEATTLE -- Attracting 10 million visitors a year, the Northwest's most famous farmers' market has been a fixture at Pike Place since a muddy morning in August 1907.
    "This is a concept born out of desperation," market master Teri Wheeler said.
    Farmers claimed middlemen were paying them too little for their produce, and consumers complained food prices were too high. As prices spiked, a city councilman and a newspaper publisher set the stage for a grand experiment: farmers selling directly to consumers.
    Fewer than a dozen farmers wheeled their carts to Seattle's waterfront, but thousands of customers showed up. The farmers knew they had something special.
    That experiment has grown into a market boasting 50 farmers on a busy day, surrounded by flower growers, entertainers, craftspeople and food booths, much like any other farmers' market in small-town America.
    But some things set Pike Place Market apart. Besides the market, the Pike Place Market Preservation and Development Authority includes a senior center, food bank, child care and preschool, clinic, low-income housing, and permanent commercial enterprises that bring in a combined $13.1 million a year in income and has operating expenses of $9.8 million, senior accountant Jay Shallow said.
    The market generated $11 million in sales in July alone, he said. It brings in about $1 million a year in stall rent, cooler and locker rent and other fees charged to vendors, according to the authority's budget.
    In this bustling urban setting, the market keeps fresh produce as its centerpiece, encouraging the presence of farmers from across the state, Wheeler said.
    Some arrive by 6:30 a.m. to set up, especially if they're from out of town, and everyone is required to sell from 10 to 4, she said.
    Flower farmers, who number in the dozens, are also encouraged to bring produce.
    "The ones who bring in at least five varieties get a 12-foot space instead of an 8-foot space at no extra cost," Wheeler said. "And if they bring in 8 feet of produce, they get a free parking pass."
    Everything comes down at night, both the day stalls outside and the stalls in the arcade.
    The day stalls can sell only products made or grown by the person who rents the space.
    "We have very strict rules concerning supplements to added-value products," she said. "Everything must come from the farm, so we have very few added-value products there."
    In the permanent indoor stalls are commercial tenants. One of those, Sosio's Fruit and Produce, was started in 1930 by "Grandpa Sosio" Manzo, Wheeler said.
    "We buy from farmers, as many small farmers as I can. We make sure shoppers know where the produce comes from by putting farmers' names on their product," said Mike Osborn, who bought the stand from Sosio Manzo's grandson.
    Some grow especially for Sosio's, he said. "We also buy from farmers displaying here. I'll support a local farmer before I'll buy from a warehouse."
    Nothing goes to waste. Farmers donate 50,000 pounds of unsold produce each year to the Pike Place food bank, Wheeler said.
    No public money goes into the operation of the market, Wheeler said.


    Near-extinction event
    One major hiccup in the growth of Pike Place Market came in 1942, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Executive Order 9066 led to the incarceration of 110,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry.
    The number of farmer-sellers at the market dropped precipitously. In 1939, 515 Japanese-American farmers sold at the market; in 1949, there were 53.
    The resulting decline in business nearly led to the market's demise in the 1950s and '60s. The city proposed redeveloping the area as a plaza with a hotel, office buildings and a hockey arena.
    But in a 1971 public initiative, voters chose to preserve Pike Place Market. In particular, the market was instructed to preserve its original focus on fresh produce and local farmers. Among the rules, commercial businesses were -- and still are -- required to be small and owner-operated. Starbucks' first cafe began serving its famous coffee there in 1971.
    In 1973, the city chartered the Pike Place Market Preservation and Development Authority to manage most of the properties in the Market Historical District.
    -- Steve Brown


    By the numbers
    Visitors annually: 10 million
    Pounds of ice used per day in high season: 19,000
    People served by the food bank: 500
    People served daily at the senior center: 110
    Organized school tours annually: 50
    Footprint in acres: 9

    Contacts
    www.pikeplacemarket.org
    Teri Wheeler: [email protected]
    Sosio's: 206-622-1370
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  4. TopTop #3
    theindependenteye's Avatar
    theindependenteye
    Supporting Member

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Seattle's Pike Place Market is indeed a wondrous thing, and it's not only year-round but daily, and a major destination. But seriously, can you imagine the outrage if anyone proposed doing something remotely similar in Sebastopol? All the arguments that have been brought up in reference to ANY development (at least during the decade we've lived here) -- traffic, competition with downtown business, changing the character of the town, natural resources impact, etc. -- would come up ALL-CAPs.

    This isn't to take sides on any specific development proposal, but if I were on the City Council I'd be hard pressed to imagine ANY development within the city limits that wouldn't have a very sizeable number of people up in arms about it. Let's face it: none of us want empty buildings or a declining downtown or an eroding tax base, but neither do we want any enterprise that brings in more than about three cars per annum. I don't mean to be snide about people's honest concerns, but doesn't it seem that collectively they add up to an empty Pellini building, an empty Northwest Quadrant, an absence of lower-income housing, etc.?

    Perhaps a generous soul will come along and donate $XX million to build a major arts center/farmers' market/multi-use facility on the Barlow property or elsewhere, with a free out-of-town parking lot, shuttle-bus service and a fresh-water aquaduct from Oregon, and another $XX million to maintain it. Till then, it seems as if there ain't gonna be nothing.

    Quizzically--
    Conrad
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  6. TopTop #4

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Pike's Market is wonderful. But it would never work in Sebastopol and not for the reasons stated in this thread. Most importantly, there is not enough of a customer base here to support such a market--Seattle is a big city. Pike's thrives as a central market for restaurateurs, locals, tourists, people in search of lunch, people looking for souvenirs, etc. It is both enormous and centrally located, with a very large potential customer base. There is no comparable location anywhere in Sonoma County.
    However, I believe a year-round farmers market based somewhere in west county--and Sebastopol is the logical location--is both viable and eagerly anticipated. I'm hoping it will happen in 2012. It could.
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  8. TopTop #5
    scamperwillow's Avatar
    scamperwillow
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    The Barlow Development will be on the agenda at the City Council TONIGHT. Good chance to see what is proposed and to weigh in. Best to learn the facts before forming an opinion. I went to the presentation by the developer sponsored by the Chamber a couple of weeks ago. There are a lot of cool things about this project and some reasons for concern too. Become informed - this is a BIG project.
    Last edited by Barry; 09-27-2011 at 06:54 PM.
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  9. TopTop #6
    scamperwillow's Avatar
    scamperwillow
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Ooops - it is at the Planning commission. 5:30 is a study session on CEQA and the General Plan, then regular agenda at 7:00.

    8. Regular Agenda:
    A. MAJOR USE PERMIT (2011-018) - This is a request by Barney Aldridge for Use Permit
    approval to have a 45,978 sq. ft. production winery and small tasting room on the property
    located at 200 Morris Street.

    B. MAJOR USE PERMIT (2011-039) - This is a request by Steve Kilgannon for Barney Aldridge
    for a Use Permit for approval of severally conditionally-permitted uses at the “Sebastopol
    Cooperative” property located at 6765, 6775, and 6793 McKinley Street. Proposed uses include a
    yoga studio, an exercise facility, a production winery, a brewing company, and a community
    events space. This item was continued from the September 13, 2011 meeting.

    9. Discussion:

    Quote scamperwillow wrote: View Post
    The Barlow Development will be on the agenda at the City Council TONIGHT. Good chance to see what is proposed and to weigh in. Best to learn the facts before forming an opinion. I went to the presentation by the developer sponsored by the Chamber a couple of weeks ago. There are a lot of cool things about this project and some reasons for concern too. Become informed - this is a BIG project.
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  10. TopTop #7
    Mrs. Wacco's Avatar
    Mrs. Wacco
    Behind every great man...

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Is the CEQA study group related to the Barlow - are they scoping what studies need to be performed?

    The Project originally was called a "renovation" project because they were keeping a part of the existing building, as a way to avoid CEQA analysis. Does anyone know if it still is being considered a "renovation". A CEQA study absolutely needs to be done for the new proposed project. If the CEQA study group is NOT about the Barlow, I would HIGHLY recommend some one ask this question. This is no longer a "renovation" (I cannot be there otherwise I'd ask myself.)
    Quote scamperwillow wrote: View Post
    Ooops - it is at the Planning commission. 5:30 is a study session on CEQA and the General Plan, then regular agenda at 7:00.

    8. Regular Agenda:
    A. MAJOR USE PERMIT (2011-018) - This is a request by Barney Aldridge for Use Permit
    approval to have a 45,978 sq. ft. production winery and small tasting room on the property
    located at 200 Morris Street.

    B. MAJOR USE PERMIT (2011-039) - This is a request by Steve Kilgannon for Barney Aldridge
    for a Use Permit for approval of severally conditionally-permitted uses at the “Sebastopol
    Cooperative” property located at 6765, 6775, and 6793 McKinley Street. Proposed uses include a
    yoga studio, an exercise facility, a production winery, a brewing company, and a community
    events space. This item was continued from the September 13, 2011 meeting.

    9. Discussion:
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  11. TopTop #8
    scamperwillow's Avatar
    scamperwillow
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    I am guessing the CEQA and GP study sessions are general education for the PC and the public. The Barlow doesn't come up until after 7:00. There is much more than one building being considered, it is many bldgs, but they do want to keep the existing ones. I think it is an interesting project, but I have many questions. See a lot of you there, I hope.

    Quote Mrs. Wacco wrote: View Post
    Is the CEQA study group related to the Barlow - are they scoping what studies need to be performed?

    The Project originally was called a "renovation" project because they were keeping a part of the existing building, as a way to avoid CEQA analysis. Does anyone know if it still is being considered a "renovation". A CEQA study absolutely needs to be done for the new proposed project. If the CEQA study group is NOT about the Barlow, I would HIGHLY recommend some one ask this question. This is no longer a "renovation" (I cannot be there otherwise I'd ask myself.)
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  12. TopTop #9
    scamperwillow's Avatar
    scamperwillow
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Here is a link to reports and drawings about the project:
    http://ci.sebastopol.ca.us/page/special-projects
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  13. TopTop #10
    Mrs. Wacco's Avatar
    Mrs. Wacco
    Behind every great man...

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Thanks.

    i would love to see the traffic study vs just the NegDec report.
    Quote scamperwillow wrote: View Post
    Here is a link to reports and drawings about the project:
    http://ci.sebastopol.ca.us/page/special-projects
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  15. TopTop #11
    scamperwillow's Avatar
    scamperwillow
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    I think this looks like a very exciting project - one we can all get behind. Let's support something for a change instead of gripe, gripe, gripe.
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  17. TopTop #12
    caverly's Avatar
    caverly
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    My apprehension about the Barlow year-round farmers market is the immense loss of the village square farmers market we currently have on Sundays ; with trees , grass to lie on and leisurely visit , live music in a natural setting , natural space for kids to play and dance . The town square of Sebastopol is an immense asset and coming together place for us to be community . The neighborhood
    merchants { who are open all week for us } benefit and we need to be aware of and support our local merchants .
    Saturday's and most days of the week the village square is mostly empty and would be empty on Sunday's if the Barlow took over .
    What a loss to discontinue to use this unique asset of our village .

    Is the reason for the contemplated move mostly all about money { in particular Barlow } ? Hasn't our values and culture been ruined enough in subservience to the Dollar ? Sebastopol has charm and unique flavor of a village ; let's not destroy this village setting and get-together .
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  19. TopTop #13

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    I don't think the proposed move is about money at all. Although I agree it would be a great loss to the "village"--I love the market where it is- the market needs additional space for more vendors; there is a waiting list and many local producers are angry that they cannot participate. It would also be great if the market were to operate year round, as the Santa Rosa market does. The location in the town square makes both options impossible. My understanding is that these are the two primary issues.
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  21. TopTop #14
    Magick's Avatar
    Magick
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Hi! Linda, great to see you today! You are right! Yes, I spoke of the fact that this was called a remodel or renovation and then once it was down the pipeline with approval from the Design Review Board, he adds a huge winery and says it can't financially work without it. So was this just a way to avoid an Environmental Impact Report?
    And what would've happened, I asked, with this approved project, since it was not financially feasible?
    The businesses that want to go in there, the idea of manufacturing our own goods, and a year round market are great ideas, but the location, a flood zone, the shaky ground around the finances, the shaky ground period, (this is a liquefaction zone), all gave me pause.
    I suggested a while back that we could daylight Zimpher creeK but Barney said it wouldn't be feasible.
    Then the NegDec said there are no naturally occurring creeks or "water features" (I hate that term).
    I have a vision....if you want to know I would be glad to share it with you.
    Quote Mrs. Wacco wrote: View Post
    Is the CEQA study group related to the Barlow - are they scoping what studies need to be performed?

    The Project originally was called a "renovation" project because they were keeping a part of the existing building, as a way to avoid CEQA analysis. Does anyone know if it still is being considered a "renovation". A CEQA study absolutely needs to be done for the new proposed project. If the CEQA study group is NOT about the Barlow, I would HIGHLY recommend some one ask this question. This is no longer a "renovation" (I cannot be there otherwise I'd ask myself.)
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  23. TopTop #15
    scamperwillow's Avatar
    scamperwillow
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    The move of the Farm Market is entirely up to the Farm Market - they will do what they think is the best for the market. No one is forcing them to do anything.

    Quote caverly wrote: View Post
    My apprehension about the Barlow year-round farmers market is the immense loss of the village square farmers market we currently have on Sundays ; with trees , grass to lie on and leisurely visit , live music in a natural setting , natural space for kids to play and dance . The town square of Sebastopol is an immense asset and coming together place for us to be community . The neighborhood
    merchants { who are open all week for us } benefit and we need to be aware of and support our local merchants .
    Saturday's and most days of the week the village square is mostly empty and would be empty on Sunday's if the Barlow took over .
    What a loss to discontinue to use this unique asset of our village .

    Is the reason for the contemplated move mostly all about money { in particular Barlow } ? Hasn't our values and culture been ruined enough in subservience to the Dollar ? Sebastopol has charm and unique flavor of a village ; let's not destroy this village setting and get-together .
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  24. TopTop #16
    gardenmaniac's Avatar
    gardenmaniac
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Quote oliviathunderkitty wrote: View Post
    I don't think the proposed move is about money at all. Although I agree it would be a great loss to the "village"--I love the market where it is- the market needs additional space for more vendors; there is a waiting list and many local producers are angry that they cannot participate. It would also be great if the market were to operate year round, as the Santa Rosa market does. The location in the town square makes both options impossible. My understanding is that these are the two primary issues.
    I'm not so sure we need, or even can support, a year round farmers' market -- how many of you go to Santa Rosa market in December? January? February? In case you haven't noticed, there isn't much there, at least not that has been grown by local farmers. And the few farmers who are there might not have much to sell at a market the next day. So in the off season, what we might have is a craft fair with a small amount of local produce, something I doubt it'd be very popular in the rain. In my not so humble opinion, it'd be a shame to lose the flavor of our Sunday Market. As for the "many local producers ... waiting to participate", how about a second in-season market on another day?
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  26. TopTop #17

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    It is a misconception that there isn't much at a winter farmers market. There are currently three that operate year-round in Sonoma County. Many farmers have winter crops--salad greens, braising greens, root vegetables, citrus. They also have apples, winter squash, onions, mushrooms and much much more. Some have storage onions and plenty of garlic from summer's harvest. In addition, farmers markets have become among the best--and perhaps the best--sources for grass-fed poultry and meats, locally-made sausage, fresh fish and eggs from pastured chickens. There's local olive oil, local vinegar, local honey, along with locally prepared foods to supplement home cooking or replace it in case of emergency. One reason west county residents may not have the habit in the winter months is the requirement to drive to Santa Rosa. I make the drive, weekly, rain or shine. What's the option? Out of season produce from the southern hemisphere? I don't want an apricot in February.
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  28. TopTop #18
    Thad's Avatar
    Thad
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    A grand presumption that generally rules on project design is that everyone's schedule should be the same, 8 to 5 work and 10 Pm to bed, there's many who would like a more involved night time scene, what's available after dark is generally the movie theater and bars so where's the thought for those who prefer a night schedule? I see no reason things can't be woven into play that would provide a night time economy besides what the police end up having to deal with...
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  30. TopTop #19
    gardenmaniac's Avatar
    gardenmaniac
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Quote oliviathunderkitty wrote: View Post
    It is a misconception that there isn't much at a winter farmers market. There are currently three that operate year-round in Sonoma County. Many farmers have winter crops--salad greens, braising greens, root vegetables, citrus. They also have apples, winter squash, onions, mushrooms and much much more. Some have storage onions and plenty of garlic from summer's harvest. In addition, farmers markets have become among the best--and perhaps the best--sources for grass-fed poultry and meats, locally-made sausage, fresh fish and eggs from pastured chickens. There's local olive oil, local vinegar, local honey, along with locally prepared foods to supplement home cooking or replace it in case of emergency. One reason west county residents may not have the habit in the winter months is the requirement to drive to Santa Rosa. I make the drive, weekly, rain or shine. What's the option? Out of season produce from the southern hemisphere? I don't want an apricot in February.
    I agree with some of what you say, in that I have been shopping farmers' markets for more than 3 decades, currently hit at least 3 per week in search of the best, freshest and modst local produce available. Depending on where I'll be working, I might hit Marin Th/Su, Berkeley Tu/Sat, SF Ferry Plaza Tu/Sat, Santa Rosa W/Sat, and our own on Sunday. So I'm no stranger to the variety of winter offerings. My point is more that with the 3 all-year markets to which you refer, I'm not sure how much will be available for a 4th winter market. I shop markets primarily for produce. Here's what was posted for the last Sunday in November last year: Javier’s lovely goat cheese, Paul’s luscious smoked salmon, the last tomatoes of the season, Black Sheep Farm’s fabulous fabulous pork & beef, lots of succulent greens, potatoes and squashes for the winter. From then on thru March, April, May, do you think it will be viable for these few folk to come on down and set up shop? Even when it rains? Yes, one of my favorite possessions is this big button pinned on my jacket: "I shop at the Berkeley Farmers' Market EVEN WHEN IT RAINS." And I gotta tell you, there have been many Tuesdays when I was one of only a handful of shoppers. Now, I often drive on down to the Laguna Farm and do my shopping there. They do have year round crops, and a thriving CSA.
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  32. TopTop #20

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    One of Sebastopol's regular farmers and I had a conversation on this topic earlier today and it turns out he has been lobbying for a year-round Sebastopol market for more than a decade. As the final markets approach, his best season--sales-wise--is just kicking in. His harvest is quite diverse and he would be a mainstay of a year-round Sebastopol market. And there are others who say similar things. Very few people in west county have the time or inclination to drive to Sonoma for the Friday morning market; getting to the Wednesday morning market is difficult for many, too. That leaves Saturday morning, which is great for some but difficult or impossible for others. There are so many farmers in this area, many with year-round harvests, that the general consensus by those who sell at the market and those who shop there regularly is an enthusiastic thumbs up for going year round.
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  34. TopTop #21
    Barry's Avatar
    Barry
    Founder & Moderator

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    [Paula Downing asked me to post this for her.]

    Hi, This is Paula, contributing my two cents as the Sebastopol farm market manager:

    When you think about the Barlow, just think about the possible alternatives: An ugly, corporate Chase Bank/CVS pharmacy, for example, or the original concept that was proposed and supported by most of the city council at the time - hundreds of apartments, four stories high, and thousands of square feet of retail space! (Goodbye down town!) Any other corporate funded nightmares you would like to envision??! ! How about Walmart? If we have a Chase/CVS complex on the Pellini corner, why not?

    No doubt about it we are going to get something in this space! Here is our chance not to have a corporate monster at the gateway to Sebastopol. Here is our chance to renew and rebirth Sebastopol as a food and farm center of west county. When I weigh and balance all the options, I can't imagine why we would pass this up!

    This is an expensive project, a vision that one man, Barney Aldridge, embraced as a result of the encouragement of many people who have been dreaming and hoping for many years to return Sebastopol to its historic roots as a food producing community. Think about that! A Santa Rosa kid who made some money and has made such a complete personal commitment to create this vision that he just sold his home and moved into an apartment to help pay for the project. One guy! Not Chase bank!

    I just reread one of Wendell Barry's essay about saving us from the near complete slavery that we are now experiencing as a result of the ownership of corporate banks, insurance companies, etc., of our government, including the Supreme Court, and ourselves. Wendell believes that government will not save us (Oh, Barack, how sad it is!); that our only hope is to take back our communities and create something ourselves. Jesus! Let's do that at the Barlow! Sure, express your concerns, works to alleviate whatever problems you see, but get the vision - get the possibilities! Sonoma County has some of the most amazing food on the planet. I love the idea of immersing the Sunday farmers market in the middle of a community of small, local manufacturers of ravioli, cheese, salsa, tomato sauce, olive oil. kambucha and whatever. To develop a local food economy we need space for the food entrepreneurs to work. Here it is!

    Also get the brutal reality. There has to be enough money to pay for this, enough to get the banks to lend to create the project. The wineries involved have some money - and they are small guys we can live with - compared to Gallo, for example.

    About farmers markets in the winter: We will have some shelter but the idea is to bring your umbrella and support your local farmers. Shopping in the rain is exhilarating, actually; it's about how good it feels, sensually and emotionally, to connect our personal selves with the physical world and to experience the seasons - green food in winter; the excitement that comes with the first red food of spring (strawberries usually); and on into the bounty of summer. I work the Santa Rosa market all year long. We have tons of winter greens, squashes, potatoes - foods that our bodies need in the cold. Crafters stay home in bad weather because their stuff gets ruined but the farmers are always out there, except when the wind is ugly (wind eats tents). If the rain is really aggressive, we just bring out the Bloody Marys!

    About the current market square: I love the square but it has become way too small. When I started managing nearly 20 years ago we had about 10 vendors. Now we have room for about 45. We could invite more young, innovative food producers if we had more room, which we would have at The Barlow. Barney has committed to creating a play space similar to the square at the Barlow. The market won't move unless we have that.

    What else? Embrace the vision - I hope. Keep talking here on WACCO. Or find me at the market. Or call me at 829-3494. Or call Barney at The Barlow at 484-8020.

    Paula
    Sebastopol Farm Market Manager

    P.S..We have decided to keep the market open all year long starting this year - right where we are - so you can see how it feels to shop in the rain starting now!
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  35. TopTop #22

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    <>

    WOW!!!!! Fabulous news, Paula. Yay!!! I'd do handsprings if I could.

    Great, thoughtful post overall, too, full of wisdom and thoughtfulness. Thank you.
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  36. TopTop #23
    scamperwillow's Avatar
    scamperwillow
     

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Yeah Paula! I agree with all of this! and so glad the market will stay open!!

    Quote Barry wrote: View Post
    [Paula Downing asked me to post this for her.]

    Hi, This is Paula, contributing my two cents as the Sebastopol farm market manager:

    When you think about the Barlow, just think about the possible alternatives: An ugly, corporate Chase Bank/CVS pharmacy, for example, or the original concept that was proposed and supported by most of the city council at the time - hundreds of apartments, four stories high, and thousands of square feet of retail space! (Goodbye down town!) Any other corporate funded nightmares you would like to envision??! ! How about Walmart? If we have a Chase/CVS complex on the Pellini corner, why not?
    snip.....
    P.S..We have decided to keep the market open all year long starting this year - right where we are - so you can see how it feels to shop in the rain starting now!
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  37. TopTop #24
    theindependenteye's Avatar
    theindependenteye
    Supporting Member

    Re: Barlow Development: year-round farmers market

    Wow, Paula, year-round? Fantastic -- Elizabeth Fuller
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