Illegal Cannabis Growing

Thread: Illegal Cannabis Growing

  1. Ronaldo's Avatar

    Ronaldo said:

    Illegal Cannabis Growing

    Kudos to Shepard Bliss and his neighbors for his Open Mic article published in this week's Bohemian (Aug23—29). A good example of how we can make a difference in environmental protection.

    http://bit.ly/2wIU4DA
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  3. Shepherd's Avatar

    Shepherd said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing

    My appreciations to Ronaldo for his post below. The Sept. Sonoma County Gazette is scheduled to have an article on illegal cannabis growing that is twice as long as the Bohemian article. I also have articles 4 times as long being published by the national publications that I write for regularly. Following are links to some of those articles:

    Illegal Cannabis Growing articles by Shepherd Bliss

    Shut It Down | Open Mic | North Bay Bohemian, https://www.bohemian.com/northbay/shut-it down/Content?oid=3873984, Neighbors rally against illegal cannabis grows. ... Shepherd Bliss ([email protected] net) has farmed the Sebastopol countryside for 24 years and ...(allows comments)

    http://augustafreepress.com/neighbor...annabis-grows/ , from Virginia, (allows comments)

    http://www.smirkingchimp.com/thread/...cannabis-grows (allows comments)

    http://dissidentvoice.org/2017/08/ne...annabis-grows/

    5. Neighbors Shut Down Illegal Cannabis Grow – Wine And Water Watch, winewaterwatch.org/2017/08/neighbors-shut-down-illegal-cannabis-grow/ Neighbors Shut Down Illegal Cannabis Grow by Dr. Shepherd Bliss. Disclosure: I' m a Peace in Medicine patient. CBD-rich cannabis improves ...

    Quote Ronaldo wrote: View Post
    Kudos to Shepard Bliss and his neighbors for his Open Mic article published in this week's Bohemian (Aug23—29). A good example of how we can make a difference in environmental protection.

    http://bit.ly/2wIU4DA
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  5. Shepherd's Avatar

    Shepherd said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing

    In addition to the five sites mentioned below that have published versions of my cannabis article, the Sept. Sonoma County Gazette version, with photos documenting the illegal grows in 2 different places, is now on news stands. The Russian River Times is scheduled to publish a longer version this month.

    Also following are links to some of the other over a dozen places around the nation that have published an even longer version. Our Bloomfield/Lone Pine/Cunningham Neighborhood Association wants to discourage corporate growers from coming here. Please consider voicing concerns that you may have to some of these publications and elsewhere. Last week's Bohemian has a response in the print edition and a different one in the online edition.

    Neighbors Shut Down Illegal Cannabis Grow – Wine And Water Watch, winewaterwatch.org/2017/08/neighbors-shut-down-illegal-cannabis-grow/ Neighbors Shut Down Illegal Cannabis Grow by Dr. Shepherd Bliss. Disclosure: I' m a Peace in Medicine patient. CBD-rich cannabis improves ...)

    Pacific Views, www.pacificviews.org/ Neighbors Shut Down Illegal Cannabis Grows by Shepherd Bliss.

    Wine And Water Watch | ecology.iww.org
    https://ecology.iww.org/aggregator/sources/511, Neighbors Shut Down Illegal Cannabis Grow by Dr. Shepherd Bliss ... I support cannabis growing that follows the rules and does not endanger creeks, wildlife, .

    Out of the Mountains: The Chick fil A Recipe
    thisandthatat.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-chick-fil-recipe.html
    Neighbors Shut Down Illegal Cannabis Grows by Shepherd Bliss;

    Mendocino County Today: Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017 | Anderson Valley ...
    theava.com/archives/72573, (Dr. Shepherd Bliss {[email protected]} has farmed in Sebastopol for 24 ...

    10. Regulation – Friends of the Eel River, eelriver.org/tag/regulation/feed/
    The basic questions about Humboldt's commercial cannabis industry are land use issues. ..... Sebastopol organic berry farmer Shepherd Bliss has helped rally a ..

    11-12. Scheduled for Sept.: Sonoma County Gazette, Russian River Times

    Quote Shepherd wrote: View Post
    My appreciations to Ronaldo for his post below. The Sept. Sonoma County Gazette is scheduled to have an article on illegal cannabis growing that is twice as long as the Bohemian article. I also have articles 4 times as long being published by the national publications that I write for regularly. Following are links to some of those articles:

    Illegal Cannabis Growing articles by Shepherd Bliss

    Shut It Down | Open Mic | North Bay Bohemian, https://www.bohemian.com/northbay/shut-it down/Content?oid=3873984, Neighbors rally against illegal cannabis grows. ... Shepherd Bliss ([email protected] net) has farmed the Sebastopol countryside for 24 years and ...(allows comments)

    http://augustafreepress.com/neighbor...annabis-grows/ , from Virginia, (allows comments)

    http://www.smirkingchimp.com/thread/...cannabis-grows (allows comments)

    http://dissidentvoice.org/2017/08/ne...annabis-grows/

    5. Neighbors Shut Down Illegal Cannabis Grow – Wine And Water Watch, winewaterwatch.org/2017/08/neighbors-shut-down-illegal-cannabis-grow/ Neighbors Shut Down Illegal Cannabis Grow by Dr. Shepherd Bliss. Disclosure: I' m a Peace in Medicine patient. CBD-rich cannabis improves ...
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  7. Shepherd's Avatar

    Shepherd said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing

    Following is a letter to the PD editor from today's paper. On Sept. 27, Wed., the County's Cannabis Advisory Group will host a public meeting, starting at 3 p.m. at 2550 Ventura, the PRMD office.

    All carrot, no stick

    EDITOR: Sonoma County’s Board of Supervisors voted to again extend the deadline for illegal marijuana farmers to get a permit or cease operations (“New deadline for marijuana grower permits,” Wednesday). This “relief” for those who are breaking the law comes at the expense of law-abiding citizens who live next door or, in the case of my neighborhood, the embattled Mark West Creek.

    The supervisors have taken this step because cannabis industry representatives pressured the Cannabis Advisory Group to recommend it be implemented. The Cannabis Advisory Group didn’t exist two months ago and had its first meeting only last month. I wonder how many Sonoma County residents know that this group, which apparently has the power to direct the voting of the Board of Supervisors, even exists.

    The supervisors assured us all they would use a carrot-and-stick approach to bring the growers out of the shadows, yet a meager 2 percent have registered for a permit. Where I live, marijuana cultivation is exploding exponentially. Zero illegal marijuana plants have been confiscated, and no one has been arrested.

    Obviously the carrot isn’t working. It’s time to see the stick. When growers see others being busted, they will be more motivated to “get legal.”
    LAURA WALDBAUM
    Santa Rosa
    Last edited by Barry; 09-14-2017 at 02:06 PM.
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  9. wisewomn's Avatar

    wisewomn said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing

    Shepherd, I spoke recently with a small, "boutique" grower who said many long-time small growers are reluctant to apply for permits because they are simply prohibitively expensive and over-regulated (some of the requirements are impossible to fulfill in the time period allotted). The liquor/wine and tobacco industries' regulations are much more permissive. The feeling is that the County is trying to drive the long-time small growers out of business so that the large commercial interests (liquor and tobacco) can take over. Not only will this deprive the established small growers, many of whom developed the various strains of medical marijuana and are responsible for the world-famous quality of weed from the Emerald Triangle, of their livelihoods. It will also degrade the quality of what is currently being grown and sold, so the public will suffer as well.

    Unfortunately, not only do the liquor and tobacco industries have a lot of political clout locally (and nationally), but the politicians are rubbing their hands in glee at the prospect of all the money the permit process will bring in. Their expectations are no doubt based on the street value of marijuana as reported by law enforcement because many long-time small growers simply don't have that kind of money. If the past is any indication, that money may or may not be spent wisely.

    So I am told.

    I understand your frustration and anger with the recent opportunistic, irresponsible "wildcat" growers you are encountering, but I think it is a mistake to lump them together with people who have pretty much devoted their lives to improving marijuana strains and who feel strongly about the benefits it provides.

    Unfortunately, I don't know what the solution is, but the present approach by the County is definitely not working. There are 2 sides (at least) to every story.
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  11. Shepherd's Avatar

    Shepherd said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing

    As I have done more research on cannabis cultivation, I have come to a similar conclusion as Wisewomn below. In fact, following is a rough draft of my next article, after talking with some of the cottage growers. I welcome any comments on what to change, add, or delete in the following, before I start publishing it. I also welcome quotations that I can use. I would also welcome alternative titles. I would prefer that people make their comments directly to me at [email protected] Thanks for any help on this complicated situation.

    Unpermitted Cannabis Cultivating Re-Visited,
    By Shepherd Bliss

    Rough Draft: criticisms requested, to [email protected].

    Readers of versions of this reporter’s August local and national articles on unpermitted cannabis growing have expressed both appreciations and appropriate criticisms. Over a dozen publications in and beyond Sonoma County published those articles, which ranged from 350 to 1250 words.

    As previously disclosed, I am a patient at Peace in Medicine and especially appreciate its CBD cannabis. It is essential to my health here at 73-years-old, as it is to many other elders and those with a wide variety of health issues for which cannabis is an appropriate plant medicine.

    So I do not oppose cannabis growing. It can be more healthy than many of the chemical medications to which people get addicted and is better for one’s health than alcohol. Medications such as opioids can drastically worsen one’s health, create addictions, and even lead to premature diseases and death.

    “I got my cannabis card not to get stoned, which I am too old to do,” commented businessman Andy Cohen, as our dogs played together. “I use the CBD topicals, as well as tinctures, because of my arthritis and gout. It works better than Tylenol or Ibuprofen. It doesn’t damage my liver or put a hole in my stomach.”

    This article seeks to promote dialogue among cannabis growers, users, critics, government officials, and others. People from all these groups were interviewed.

    Participants in the expanding cannabis industry have educated me about some of the complications regarding this expanding business, especially with respect to applying for permits. I have visited small and medium-size cottage cannabis operations and been informed and impressed by responsible growers.

    I support cannabis growing, especially by locals on appropriate sites that do not damage water use by humans, other animals, and plants or damage nature in other ways. Such operations provide good agricultural employment for many people, especially younger persons, some of whom would otherwise remain unemployed or under-employed. These small farms literally “keep families afloat,” as one cannabis farmer expressed. I have even come to understand why many growers do not apply for permits.

    Many distinct groups are involved in cannabis growing, including the following: small and mid-size cottage growers, corporate growers, un-permitted growers, permitted growers, neighbors and others who object to the over-use of water and environmental damage, and government officials dealing with the increasing number of grows and disputes.

    Cannabis Growers Speak Up

    Among the things that growers have said are the following:

    “Many of us feel that the legalization of marijuana has opened a Pandora’s Box, which may have many unintended consequences.”

    “Heavy-handed military tactics are a problem, which occur even on permitted sites. Growers are not terrorists.” Such tactics on legal sites were reported in an August article by the local daily Press Democrat.

    “Why was marijuana illegal back in l937? It makes no logical sense. Marijuana has always been a political crime.”

    “Many Vietnam war vets fled to Humboldt and Mendocino counties with their Post Traumatic Stress. They became back-to-the landers.”

    “Being underground is an American tradition, which goes back to the independence time and the Civil War.”

    “Mom and Pop cottage growers are being marginated by corporations.”

    “I predict that within the next year the marijuana bubble will bust and prices will go down.”

    Marijuanaland: Dispatches from an American War is a recent book by Jonah Raskin. In a September article in the AVA (Anderson Valley Advertiser), from Mendocino County, he writes the following: “The cannabis story is a story of freedom and incarceration, a rags-to-riches story, as well as a tale about American capitalism, which will capitalize on anything and everything that’s profitable. Weed brings in big bucks.”

    Sonoma County--along with the nearby Northern California Mendocino, Humboldt, and Marin counties--are the four largest growers of cannabis in the U.S. We are experiencing what some call the “green rush of capital” and the “corporatization of cannabis.” Multi-national corporations from outside that show little or no respect for the local environment or communities, which concern many locals.

    Cannabis growing has occurred in Sonoma County for at least fifty years. Most of those grows are not permitted or legal. An estimated 5,000 such cultivators exist in Sonoma County. That number may expand, since growing cannabis only became legal in California in 2016.

    Yet as of Sept. 12 only 115 cannabis applications had been submitted. The Aug. 31 deadline to submit an initial one-page application was extended by the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors to Oct. 31, with the complete application due June 1, 2018.

    “We want to see more cultivators coming out of the shadows and into the light,” said Supervisor Lynda Hopkins.

    “The solution is to bring all these growers into compliance,” said cannabis attorney Omar Figueroa. “A crackdown doesn’t work. We don’t need more prohibition. We need regulation.”

    The New York Times published a Sept. 10 article with the headline “Legal Marijuana Is Almost Here, but Some Growers Aren’t Pleased.” It focused on nearby Mendocino County. It reports that investors from Russia, China, Jamaica, Mexico, and Bulgaria are involved in marijuana growing in that county. It adds that seven times more marijuana is exported from California than used by the local market.

    Neighbors Complain About Un-permitted Grows

    Various people concerned contacted this reporter about incidents similar to the two unpermitted operations here in the Blucher Creek Watershed, which I previously reported that neighbors were able to get shut down. They were environmentally destructive and problematic, especially to families with young children.

    Our Bloomfield/Lone Pine/Cunningham Neighborhood Association connected other nearby neighbors to the correct code enforcement officer, who got unpermitted cannabis grows removed.

    “In our rural residential neighborhood a stop work order was issued last week to the owner of an operation,” one neighbor said, “but the grow and the work toward harvest continues. People are camping on the property in at least one trailer.”

    “There is no septic or legal electrical power or plumbing. The only water source is a man-made seasonal pond that dries up by this time of year. A non-permitted road was cut through the entire eighty acre parcel up to the top where there are at least six large green house grow houses, each approximately one thousand square feet in size,” he added.

    “We are concerned for our wells and springs with regard to the clear cutting of so many trees and then shoving them off the ungraded dirt road, which will likely turn to sludge as the rains come. Everyone in this once peaceful neighborhood is mindful of our water supply and use; we all work to maintain our shared dirt driveway. We are painfully aware that two of the largest and extremely devastating fires in California history were caused by illegal grow set-ups such as this one in our tiny neighborhood,” he concluded.

    Among the positive responses to our interventions to support our rural neighborhood have been the following: “The neighbors’ actions inspire me to rouse from my ‘it's inevitable’ victim attitude toward possibly illegal cannabis operations. Taking action against rule breakers has nothing to do with whether we ourselves are cannabis consumers, or how we feel about the burgeoning pot culture,” wrote Randi Farkas.

    “With the legalization of cannabis, it’s important to move towards county policies of accountability on everyone's part, including growers, lawmakers, code enforcement, clearly articulated zoning laws and neighbors not looking the other way, but holding their neighbors accountable. I voted yes to legalize cannabis growing. I did not vote yes to support black-market businesses that suck the life out of our communities,” wrote Roberta Teller.

    People concerned about cannabis in their neighborhood to observe carefully and talk with the growers, as well as take photos. After our Neighborhood Association did this, we reported two illegal grow operations to government officials, who shut them down.

    It is important for governmental agencies and members of our communities to come together to ensure that we continue to enhance our economy, while keeping the integrity of our neighborhoods and environment in tact.

    As one successful rural activist said, “Public exposure is what gets the attention of elected officials.”

    Quote wisewomn wrote: View Post
    Shepherd, I spoke recently with a small, "boutique" grower who said many long-time small growers are reluctant to apply for permits because they are simply prohibitively expensive and over-regulated ...
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  13. wisewomn's Avatar

    wisewomn said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing--One more thing

    I left out the elephant in the living room in my previous post.

    The other major impediment to getting small growers to apply for permits is that marijuana is still illegal as far as Federal law goes. Long-time small growers fear that by "going public" (applying for permits), they will become sitting ducks when and if the Feds decide to hold raids. Given the current political climate, this is not an unreasonable fear.

    Quote wisewomn wrote: View Post
    Shepherd, I spoke recently with a small, "boutique" grower who said many long-time small growers are reluctant to apply for permits because they are simply prohibitively expensive and over-regulated...
    Last edited by Barry; 09-16-2017 at 09:45 AM.
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  15. Shandi's Avatar

    Shandi said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing

    Thank you so much for providing this very important piece of information. Although I haven't personally talked with cottage growers, I was one, in the past, and I would have the same perspectives that you've shared. This means that small growers will have to remain underground to continue to do what they do best, by providing us with the variety and quality of plants that we depend on for many ailments. to relax, in a world of upside down values. Our "wine country" is a perfect example.

    Quote wisewomn wrote: View Post
    Shepherd, I spoke recently with a small, "boutique" grower who said many long-time small growers are reluctant to apply for permits because they are simply prohibitively expensive and over-regulated...
    /
    Last edited by Barry; 09-16-2017 at 09:47 AM.
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  17. rossmen said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing

    This rapidly changing livelihood will change more than we know is possible now. I see the changes everyday now. The plots are bigger, more open, more outside, less protected, money flowing, the boom has not quite busted.

    Yes, the county has set it up so that wine will take over cannabis cultivation in soco. This was at the request of neighbors. Think of it as classic dielectric theory; action, reaction, unintended consequences.

    There are still underground markets to the east propping up the price, NY, ill, TX. When these at least go medical then this powerful plant will return fully to its role as a human ally. Just like all the other species who have evolved with us. For some people pot will be rats, for others sourdough culture. Overall a lot less fun for an anarchist minded person like me, yeye!
    Last edited by Barry; 09-16-2017 at 09:48 AM.
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  19. Dustyg's Avatar

    Dustyg said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing--One more thing

    It's really too bad that we can't trust the process and the politicians at all any longer...

    Quote wisewomn wrote: View Post
    I left out the elephant in the living room in my previous post.

    The other major impediment to getting small growers to apply for permits is that marijuana is still illegal as far as Federal law goes. Long-time small growers fear that by "going public" (applying for permits), they will become sitting ducks when and if the Feds decide to hold raids. Given the current political climate, this is not an unreasonable fear.
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  21. Chris Dec's Avatar

    Chris Dec said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing

    Shepherd, I know you are writing specifically about California growers, so you do not address the red-white-and-blue elephant in the room, the Federal government. As more states "legalize" cannabis, the Feds have an increasing source of easy arrests of humans, confiscation of land, buildings, paraphernalia, and cash. It is a backdoor bargaining chip they play with big pharmaceutical lobbyists that is growing in value with every state that legalizes. We are not in the clear until the growing, using, carrying of this useful herb is completely legal. While we fight the big fight, let's keep our ammunition ready for the even bigger fight.
    Last edited by Barry; 09-16-2017 at 11:57 PM.
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  23. Shepherd's Avatar

    Shepherd said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing

    Chris's comment below makes a lot of sense. If I would have received it earlier, I would have asked her permission to quote it in the following article. It is scheduled to appear in print and online in the Oct. issue of the Sonoma County Gazette. Monday's PD had an article about another person apparently murdered at a pot site. This crop is likely to change Sonoma County a lot.

    Cannabis Cultivating Re-Visited

    Readers of this reporter’s August local and national articles on unpermitted cannabis growing expressed both appreciations and appropriate criticisms. Their feedback has made me aware of how complicated this issue is.

    I am a patient at Peace in Medicine, a dispensary here in Sebastopol, California, and appreciate its CBD cannabis. It is essential to this 73-years-old person, as it is to other elders and those with a wide variety of health issues for which cannabis is an appropriate plant medicine.

    Cannabis can be more healthy than some of the chemical medications to which people get addicted; it is better for one’s health than alcohol. Medications such as opioids can drastically worsen one’s health, create addictions, and even cause death.

    “I got my cannabis card not to get stoned, which I am too old to do,” commented businessman Andy Cohen. “I use CBD topicals, as well as tinctures, because of my arthritis and gout. It works better than Tylenol or Ibuprofen. It doesn’t damage my liver or put a hole in my stomach.”

    This article seeks to promote dialogue among cannabis growers, users, critics, government officials, and others. Participants in the expanding cannabis business have educated me about some of the complications, especially with respect to applying for permits and how expensive they are.

    I support cannabis growing by locals on appropriate sites that do not damage water use by humans, other animals, and plants or harm nature in other ways. Such operations provide good agricultural employment for people. These small farms literally “keep families afloat,” as one cannabis farmer expressed.

    Cannabis Growers and Allies Speak Up

    I have visited small and medium-size cottage cannabis operations and been informed and impressed by responsible growers. Among the things they said are the following:

    “The legalization of marijuana has opened a Pandora’s Box, which will have many unintended consequences.”

    “We started growing high CBD medicinal cannabis for my cancer. We could not find it anywhere and realized we needed to grow it ourselves to insure purity and viability for my health. Unfortunately, we will also quit after this year’s harvest because of the severe and expensive regulations of the county. It's heart-breaking that this vital medicine is being capitalized on and forcing intelligent, experienced growers out of the market.”

    “I understand your frustration and anger with the recent opportunistic, irresponsible "wildcat" growers you are encountering, but I think it is a mistake to lump them together with people who have devoted their lives to improving marijuana strains and who feel strongly about the benefits it provides.”

    “An impediment to getting small growers to apply for permits is that marijuana is still illegal as far as Federal law goes. Long-time small growers fear that by applying for permits they will become sitting ducks when and if the Feds decide to hold raids. Given the current political climate, this is a reasonable fear.”

    “Mom and Pop cottage growers are being marginated by corporations.”

    Marijuanaland: Dispatches from an American War is a recent book by Jonah Raskin. In a September article in the AVA (Anderson Valley Advertiser), from Mendocino County, he writes the following: “The cannabis story is a story of freedom and incarceration, a rags-to-riches story, as well as a tale about American capitalism, which will capitalize on anything and everything that’s profitable. Weed brings in big bucks.”

    Sonoma County--along with the nearby Northern California Mendocino, Humboldt, and Marin counties--are the four largest growers of cannabis in the U.S. We are experiencing what some call the “green rush of capital” and the “corporatization of cannabis.” Multi-national corporations from outside that show little or no respect for the local environment or communities concerns many locals.

    A Sept. 10 New York Times article on Mendocino County reports that investors from Russia, China, Jamaica, Mexico, and Bulgaria are involved in marijuana growing there. Seven times more marijuana apparently is exported from California than used by the local market.

    An estimated 5,000 cannabis cultivators exist in Sonoma County. That number may expand, since growing cannabis only became legal in 2016. Yet as of Sept. 12 only 115 cannabis applications had been submitted. The Aug. 31 deadline to submit an initial one-page application was extended to Oct. 31, with the complete application due June 1, 2018.

    “We want to see more cultivators coming out of the shadows and into the light,” said Supervisor Lynda Hopkins. “The solution is to bring all these growers into compliance,” said cannabis attorney Omar Figueroa. “A crackdown doesn’t work. We don’t need more prohibition. We need regulation.”

    Neighbors Complain About Un-permitted Grows

    Various people contacted this reporter about incidents similar to the two unpermitted operations here in the Blucher Creek Watershed, which I previously reported that neighbors were able to get shut down. They were environmentally destructive and problematic, especially to families with young children. Our Bloomfield/Lone Pine/Cunningham Neighborhood Association connected other nearby neighbors to the correct code enforcement officer, who got unpermitted cannabis grows removed.

    “In our rural residential neighborhood a stop work order was issued last week to the owner of an operation, but the grow and the work toward harvest continues. People are camping on the property in at least one trailer,” said one neighbor.

    “There is no septic or legal electrical power or plumbing. The only water source is a man-made seasonal pond that dries up by this time. A non-permitted road was cut through the entire eighty acre parcel up to the top where there are at least six large grow houses, each approximately one thousand square feet in size,” he added.

    “We are concerned for our wells and springs with regard to the clear cutting of so many trees and then shoving them off the ungraded dirt road, which will likely turn to sludge as the rains come. Everyone in this once peaceful neighborhood is mindful of our water supply and use; we all work to maintain our shared dirt driveway. We are painfully aware that two of the largest and extremely devastating fires in California history were caused by illegal grow set-ups such as this one in our tiny neighborhood,” he concluded.

    Among the positive responses to our interventions to support our rural neighborhood have been the following: “The neighbors’ actions inspire me to rouse from my ‘it's inevitable’ victim attitude toward possibly illegal cannabis operations. Taking action against rule breakers has nothing to do with whether we ourselves are cannabis consumers, or how we feel about the burgeoning pot culture,” wrote Randi Farkas.

    “With the legalization of cannabis, it’s important to move towards county policies of accountability on everyone's part, including growers, lawmakers, code enforcement, clearly articulated zoning laws and neighbors not looking the other way, but holding their neighbors accountable. I voted yes to legalize cannabis growing. I did not vote yes to support black-market businesses that suck the life out of our communities,” wrote Roberta Teller.

    It is important for governmental agencies and members of our communities to come together to ensure that we continue to enhance our economy, while keeping the integrity of our neighborhoods and environment in tact.

    As one successful rural activist said, “Public exposure is what gets the attention of elected officials.”


    Quote Chris Dec wrote: View Post
    Shepherd, I know you are writing specifically about California growers, so you do not address the red-white-and-blue elephant in the room, the Federal government. As more states "legalize" cannabis, the Feds have an increasing source of easy arrests of humans, confiscation of land, buildings, paraphernalia, and cash. It is a backdoor bargaining chip they play with big pharmaceutical lobbyists that is growing in value with every state that legalizes. We are not in the clear until the growing, using, carrying of this useful herb is completely legal. While we fight the big fight, let's keep our ammunition ready for the even bigger fight.
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  25. Chris Dec's Avatar

    Chris Dec said:

    Re: Illegal Cannabis Growing

    ...in fact, Shepherd...from today's Alternet Headlines:
    More Arrests for Marijuana Than for Violent Crime Last Year

    Phillip Smith / AlterNet | September 25, 2017

    Despite spreading marijuana legalization and a growing desire for new directions in drug policy, the war on drugs continues unabated. According to the FBI's latest Uniform Crime Report, released Monday, overall drug arrests actually increased last year to 1.57 million, a jump of 5.63 percent over 2015. The increase includes marijuana arrests, which jumped by more than 75,000 last year compared to 2015, an increase of 12 percent.

    Read the whole article:
    Last edited by Barry; 09-28-2017 at 02:47 AM.
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